INK Think Tank Suggestions for Bogert School’s Scope and Sequence:
R = reading
W = writing

Week 1-2
Week 3 - 9
Week 10 - 17
Week 18 – 23
Week 24-29
Week 30 - 31
Week 32- 37
Week 38 - 40
3rd
Writing Launch
Reading Launch
Character: Bringing Characters to Life and Developing Essential Reading Skills (R)
pp. 20-23 in What’s the BIG Idea? Galileo and his thinking.
RE: Nonfiction Characters: Adventurous Women: Eight True Stories About Women Who Made a Difference (PC)
Steel Drumming at the Apollo, the Road to Super Top Dog (TM) [may work for personal narrative as well – I used the boy’s own words used to tell story of each one]
Pioneer Girl: A True Story of Growing Up on the Prairie (AW)
We Rode the Orphan Trains (AW)
Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story (AW) In all my books, readers hear the main characters in their own words.
How Ben Franklin Stole The Lightning
(RS)
This book brings Franklin’s lively personality to life and also fits into the science and Colonial history curriculum.
Personal Narrative (W)
Nonfiction: Using text structures to comprehend (R)
SPORT SHORTS (AS) Autobiographical short stories about sports by well known children's authors.

The kids might want to read some of our posts from our blog: Interesting Nonfiction for Kids about our insights into the writing process.
“When the Wolves Returned” Restoring Nature’s Balance in Yellowstone”
Each spread has special structure: a single sentence in large type for overview and a longer paragraph by photos with more information (DHP)
Personal Essay (W)
As bloggers, we are experts in this genre.
Genre Study: Series (R)
Hanna's Cold Winter (TM)
Realistic Fiction (W)
Nonfiction: Content area (Science or Social Studies) (R)
”What’s a BIG Idea?” Introduction to What’s the IBIG Idea?
Thanksgiving: The True Story, (PC)
Everglades Forever, Restoring America’s Great Wetland (TM)(R)
“Animals on the Trail with Lewis and Clark”—both science and social studies with exciting adventure component (DHP)
ANY BOOK but see IF YOU HOPPED LIKE A FROG or IF DOGS WERE DINOSUARS as ex. of creative use of sci/math in non-fiction; see WHERE IN THE WILD?, WHERE ELSE IN THE WILD?, WHAT IN THE WILD? for connec. betw. non-fiction, poetry and science (DS)
MOSQUITO BITE
BUG SHOTS (AS)
FOOTPRINTS ON THE MOON (AS)

The Crossing: How George Washington Saved the American Revolution (JM)
Nonfiction: Content based writing-essay (W)
All INK authors are experts in research and creating exciting ways to synthesize material into original works. We can all contribute here.
Adventurous Women: Eight True Stories About Women Who Made a Difference (each chpt is an essay, PC)
Same book—could write about L&C from different viewpoints—Indians, Lewis’s dog, Sacajewa (DHP)
Under Siege! Three Children at the Civil War Battle for Vicksburg (AW)
Escape From Saigon: How a Vietnam War Orphan Became an American Boy (AW)
Surviving Hitler: A Boy in the Nazi Death
HOW WE CROSSED THE WEST: THE ADVENTURES OF LEWIS AND CLARK (Rosalyn Schanzer) Based upon quotes from the explorers own journals, this book is a great way to get kids excited about writing their own journals while learning about American history, science, geography, Indian cultures, and wildlife all at the same time.
Camps (AW)
Test Prep
Poetry (R)
Poetry (W)
WHERE IN THE WILD?, WHERE ELSE IN THE WILD?, WHAT IN THE WILD? (DS)
Mystery (R)
Independent Writing (W)
4th
Writing Launch
Reading Launch
Character: Envisionment, Prediction, and Inference (R)
Personal Narrative (W)
Nonfiction: (R)
What role do questions have in sustaining a reader’s interest in a nonfiction narratives?
Any of the essays in What’s the BIG Idea? Thanksgiving: The True Story, (PC)
“The Right Dog for the Job: Irah’s Path from Service Dog to Guide Dog”—children this age love animals and would be engaged reading this book; lots of appealing photos, too (DHP)
ANY BOOK but see IF YOU HOPPED LIKE A FROG or IF DOGS WERE DINOSUARS as ex. of creative use of sci/math in non-fiction; see WHERE IN THE WILD?, WHERE ELSE IN THE WILD?, WHAT IN THE WILD? for connec. betw. non-fiction, poetry and science(DS)
SNEEZE! (AS) Shows children interacting with environment.
SPORT SHORTS (AS) Autobiographical short stories about sports by well known children's authors.
Personal Essay (W)
Social Issues Book Clubs (R)
Jeannette Rankin, First Lady of Congress (TM)
Literary Essay (W)
Genre Study:
Historical Fiction (R)
Historical Fiction Hanna’s Cold Winter (Gd3)(TM)
Realistic Fiction (W)
Test Prep
Poetry (R)
Poetry (W)
WHERE IN THE WILD?, WHERE ELSE IN THE WILD?, WHAT IN THE WILD? (DS)
Independent Reading (R)
Independent Writing (W)
5th
Writing Launch
Reading Launch
Character: Building Theories, Gathering Evidence (R) Thanksgiving: The True Story, pp. 3-76
(PC)
“The Buffalo and the Indians: A Shared Destiny”
Each chapter begins with an Indian story with different voice (DHP)
Across America on an Emigrant TrainThis book follows Robert Louis Stevenson in his trip from Scotland to America with many direct quotes.(JM)
Personal Narrative (W)
Book Clubs: Social Issues (R)
Literary Essay (W)
“Saving Audie: A Pit Bull Puppy Gets a Second Chance”
How bad is dog fignting? Are pit bulls necessarily dangerous? (DHP)
An American Plague: The True and Terrifying of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 (JM)
Genre Study:
Nonfiction (R)
There are many examples of expository prose, historical narratives in what’s the BIG Idea?
Thanksgiving: The True Story, (PC)
FROG or IF DOGS WERE DINOSAURS as ex. of creative use of sci/math in non-fiction; see WHERE IN THE WILD?, WHERE ELSE IN THE WILD?, WHAT IN THE WILD? for connec. betw. non-fiction, poetry and science; G IS FOR GOOGOL or Q is for QUARK F for ex. of creative use of alphabet book format (DS)
CARS ON MARS
(features quotes from press releases—I have ideas how to use in this area)(AS)
Feature Article (W)
Genre Book Clubs (R)
Fiction Writing (W)
Test Prep
Poetry (R)
Poetry (W)
WHERE IN THE WILD?, WHERE ELSE IN THE WILD?, WHAT IN THE WILD? (DS)
Independent Reading (R)
Student Choice
Book Reviews (W)
6th
Writing Launch
Reading Launch
Character: How Setting Shapes the Character (R)
Character: Short story/journal/diary entry (W)
Nonfiction: Narrative Nonfiction- Biography (R)
Nonfiction: memoir (W)
Short Story (R)
Short Story (W)
Fantasy Book Clubs (R)
Persuasive (W)
Test prep
Poetry (R)
Poetry (W)
Independent Reading (R)
Student Choice
Book Reviews (W)
7th
Writing Launch
Reading Launch
Fiction: Intellectual Independence of Reading Skills (R)
? (W)
Nonfiction: Literary Nonfiction (R)
Personal Essay Writing (W)
Classic and Contemporary Themes in Literature (R)
Writing about Reading (W)
Reading Skills through Short Stories (R)
Fiction Short Stories (W)
Analyzing Texts; Independent book clubs (R)
Persuasive and Explanatory Essays (W)
Drama through Mid Summer (R)
Script Writing (W)
Independent Reading (R)
Student Choice
Book Reviews (W)
8th
Writing Launch
Reading Launch
Fiction (R)
Character: Textual Analysis (W)
Nonfiction: Delineate/Evaluate argument & claims (R)
Nonfiction: Persuasive Essay (W)
Analyzing Short Texts (R)
Writing Prompts (W)
Biography Book Clubs (R)
Research Paper (W)
Test Prep
Poetry (R)
Poetry (W)
Independent Reading (R)
Student Choice
Book Reviews (W)
Grammar and Vocabulary Development units run all year.
See next page for grammar scope and sequence.
Grade
Skills to be Mastered at Grade Level (minimum expectations)
5
  • 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in general and their function in particular sentences.
  • Form and use the perfect (e.g., I had walked; I have walked; I will have walked) verb tenses.
  • Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
  • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense.*
  • Use correlative conjunctions (e.g., either/or, neither/nor).
  • 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Use punctuation to separate items in a series.*
  • Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the sentence.
  • Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It’s true, isn’t it?), and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
  • Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
  • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
  • 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.
  • Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems.
6
  • 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective, possessive).
  • Use intensive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves).
  • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.*
  • Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or ambiguous antecedents).*
  • Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others' writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve expression in conventional language.*
  • 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.*
  • Spell correctly.
  • 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.*
  • Maintain consistency in style and tone.*
7
  • 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences.
  • Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.
  • Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.*
  • 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old[,] green shirt).
  • Spell correctly.
  • 3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  • Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.*
8
  • 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Explain the function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general and their function in particular sentences.
  • Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.
  • Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, and subjunctive mood.
  • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.*
  • 2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Use punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break.
  • Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission.
  • Spell correctly.